Thomson native debuts second historical novel
By Caitlin Boland

Bob Young, a Thomson native, has had a successful career in journalism and politics and now writes historical novels about Southern history.
Thomson served as the roots through which Bob Young was able to grow.
Although born in Pasadena, California, Young’s family settled in Thomson in the early 1950s after his father was transferred to work in the Thomson Company plant in Thomson. This was followed by brief assignments in New York City and Los Angeles.
“Thomson means ‘home’ to me,” Young said. “It’s the place where I grew up, began long-term friendships and learned important small town values that remain with me to this day.”
Young discovered his love for writing and politics while living in Thomson.
“I never thought about journalism as a career growing up in Thomson, but somewhere along the way I discovered I had a knack for writing…and talking,” Young said.
While attending Thomson High School, Young began writing a weekly column on life for The McDuffie Progress and stringing stories from Thomson for The Augusta Chronicle.
While searching for part-time work, Young began working at WTWA, taking out the trash, cleaning the station after school and eventually reporting the news and playing records on air.
Young said he ended up spending more than 30 years in broadcasting, mostly at WBBQ Radio and WJBF-TV. Other stops in his broadcasting career include Brunswick; Spartanburg, South Carolina; and Denver, Colorado.
Young added that a highlight of his career was spending two years of his U.S. Air Force service working for the American Forces Vietnam Network, keeping troops informed and entertained during the war.
“During my career I covered a number of important events and amazing people, but I got the most satisfaction out of being able to use the influence of my position to get government to work for people,” Young said.
Young’s interest in politics began on the campus of Thomson High School.
“My first recollection is participating in a rally for Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater at the flag pole at Thomson High School in 1964 (when I wasn’t yet old enough to vote),” Young said. “I don’t know what drew me initially, but I have since then had an abiding interest in politics. I enjoyed covering political campaigns as a reporter, and later working on campaigns and attending the national Republican conventions as a delegate.”
FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS, see the full story in the Jan. 11, 2018, issue of The McDuffie Progress. To have The McDuffie Progress delivered to your home or business each week, simply call 706-595-1601 to subscribe. Or, follow the link on our home page to subscribe.





McDuffie Progress




McDuffie Progress

McDuffie Progress





McDuffie Progress