TMMS’ Taylor nominated for national education award
By Caitlin Boland

Quensweler Taylor is surrounded by her math students. Shown from left are Andre’ Moss, Zavion Cade, MaKayla Martin, Crashekia Durham, Porshay Lucas, JaKayla Rolan, Jalyn Hill, Aniya Pinkston and E’Lexsiona Boyd.
A Thomson-McDuffie Middle School teacher has been nominated for the LifeChanger of the Year Award.
Quensweler Taylor, a math support teacher at TMMS, was nominated by someone who wishes to remain anonymous. The award, which is sponsored and run by National Life Group and the National Life Group Foundation, recognizes “K-12 educators and school employees across the country. Our program celebrates those who are making a significant difference in the lives of students by exemplifying excellence, positive influence and leadership,” according to the LifeChanger of the Year website.
Taylor has been teaching for nine years and is a product of the McDuffie County School System. While attending Thomson High School, a program for future teachers was created, and Taylor signed up, spending half of her senior year as a student teacher at Thomson Middle School.
“Being a teacher was the only thing in life I wanted to be,” Taylor said. “I would tutor my friends and they were able to pass. I knew this was a true calling.”
Taylor’s journey to being a teacher wasn’t always an easy one.
Taylor’s mother passed away when she was 18, and Taylor’s grandmother had to take on the role of caring for Taylor’s older sister who was three at the time, Taylor who was two at the time and Taylor’s younger sister who was six months old.
“Things became hard for me after my father was incarcerated,” Taylor said. “My grandmother could not read or write. All she could do was make an X for her signature.”
Taylor said she was an angry child because she saw other children enjoying moments with their mothers, something she wasn’t able to experience.
“I would have the worst attitude with all of my teachers, and my grades in elementary school were terrible,” Taylor said. “They wanted to label me, and my grandmother was upset. She knew I was capable of exceeding. She refused to tolerate it from me.”





McDuffie Progress




McDuffie Progress

McDuffie Progress





McDuffie Progress