Wilkes Co. celebrates history with Revolutionary Days
By Caitlin Boland

Re-enactors stand ready as the 1776 colors are lowered from the flagpole.
History came alive in Washington, Georgia, over the weekend as re-enactors dressed in colonial attire descended on the Town Square.
The Revolutionary Days, celebrated each year during the second weekend in February mark the anniversary of the Battle of Kettle Creek, fought on Feb. 14, 1779.
The battle, according to Georgia’s Revolutionary War Trail, was the only Revolutionary battle won in Georgia.
In 1779, Georgia was under British control, except for Wilkes County. Wilkes was called the “Hornet’s Nest.” After Savannah was captured by the Loyalists, British Lt. Col. Archibald Campbell ordered Loyalist Col. (James or John) Boyd to gather a large force in both North and South Carolina. He also told Maj. John Hamilton to rally additional troops in Wilkes County. As Boyd came into Georgia, he had more than 700 Loyalist militia.
In early February 1779, Col. Andrew Pickens and approximately 200 South Carolina militia and Col. John Dooly and Lt. Col Elijah Clarke with approximately 160 Wilkes County Georgia militia joined forces to pursue Hamilton. They caught up with Hamilton at Carr’s Fort in Wilkes County, where Pickens learned Boyd’s moves.
Boyd then crossed the Broad River, making camp on Feb. 13 not far from present-day Washington. On Feb. 14, Boyd halted his troops to eat breakfast near Kettle Creek -- less than a mile from Carr’s Fort. The horses were left to graze, and Boyd’s men were slaughtering stolen cattle, according to Georgia’s Revolutionary War Trail.
FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS, see the full story in the Feb. 16, 2017 issue of The McDuffie Progress. To have The McDuffie Progress delivered to your home or business each week, simply call 706-595-1601 to subscribe. Or, follow the link on our home page to subscribe.





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