• Author tells Georgia’s history with a twist
By Linda Green

William Rawlins speaks to the Kiwanis Club of Thomson. Photo by Linda Green.

The boll weevil was not the only force that wiped out the cotton economy in the 1920s. There were other economic forces in play, said a local author.
William Rawlins, of Sandersville, spoke to the Kiwanis Club of Thomson on Jan. 6 about his current book, “A Killing on Ring Jaw Bluff: The Great Recession and the Death of Small Town Georgia.”
In the midst of presenting his latest offering, he also declared a love for writing fiction and nonfiction books as well as writing articles for “Georgia Backroads” magazine.
The current book, endowed by the Watson-Brown Foundation, tells the story of Georgia’s economy with a personal twist. Rawlins recounts rural Georgia through the eyes of his wealthy uncle Charles Graves Rawlins, a 1930s small town businessman who was also accused of murdering his cousin and business partner Gus Tarbutton.
“This book is really an economic history of Georgia,” Rawlins said. “It is a story about why the small towns in Georgia failed. It is also an interesting piece of personal history.”

To read more on this story, see the Sun., Jan. 12, edition of The McDuffie Progress.





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McDuffie Progress

McDuffie Progress





McDuffie Progress